STUDY: Natural Tooth Preservation Versus Extraction and Implant Placement

Modern endodontics offers patients advancements in technologies, procedures, and materials. For your patients who have diseased or damaged teeth, giving your patients treatment options to either save their natural teeth or extract teeth and replace with dental implants is beneficial to help meet their aesthetic, functional, and economic needs. It is important to explain all of the options to your patients, so they understand how specific treatments will affect them. Always evaluate your patient’s condition to present the best treatment plans that will give them optimal oral health. An Italian study conducted in 2018 sought to highlight the importance of ensuring the patient’s participation during dental treatment decision-making. Furthermore, researchers wanted to evaluate whether dental treatment cost influences patients’ oral health decisions. 

By Bill Warner | February 19, 2020|

Dental Technology, Dental Implants

MINI IMPLANTS FOR ORTHODONTIC ANCHORAGE

Orthodontic anchorage is a fairly new dental innovation that is used to resist the force applied to patients’ teeth. Successful orthodontic anchorage treatments rely on the adequate control of the anchorage. The main challenge in using the natural dentition for anchorage of minor tooth movements, whether with traditional fixed orthodontic appliances or clear aligners, is the management of reciprocal forces. These forces can result in unintended movement of adjacent teeth, apical root resorption, and disruption of occlusal harmony, including supraeruption and canting. Ideas and concepts are constantly evolving in the area of orthodontic anchorage. It is important to stay up-to-date on the latest innovations and trends. In the study reviewed below, researchers discussed and analyzed the effectiveness of orthodontic miniscrew implants in anchorage reinforcement during en-masse retraction. 

By Bill Warner | February 11, 2020|

Dental Technology, Dental Implants

THE HISTORY OF DENTAL IMPLANTS

In today’s world, dental implants are considered the most advanced solution for tooth restoration. Technology is helping dental and oral health clinicians provide faster, more accurate, and well-rounded treatment to their patients. Before the invention of modern dental implants in 1952, people sought treatment for replacing teeth using a variety of methods. Through decades of scientific research and clinical practice, researchers improved implant design and functionality. Throughout the history of civilization, people have tried to replace teeth for functional and aesthetic reasons. For a historical look at the development of dental implants, read below. 

By Bill Warner | February 05, 2020|

Dental Technology, Dental Implants

STUDY (Netherlands): Experience with Bruxism in the Everyday Oral Implantology Practice

Bruxism (teeth grinding and clenching) is generally considered a contraindication for dental implants, although the evidence for this is usually based on clinical experience only. There is generalized agreement that excessive stress to the bone-implant boundary may result in implant overload and failure.

LEARN HOW NERVE ELECTRICAL STIMULATION ENHANCES OSSEOINTEGRATION OF IMPLANTS

Thanks to advancements in dental technology, you and your technicians can provide quicker and more precise implant treatment to your patients. For dental implant treatment, three to sixth months is the general recovery time. Based on the findings of a new case study, nerve electrical stimulation has the potential to develop a groundbreaking method to facilitate the implant-bone osseointegration process.

WHAT WILL DENTAL IMPLANTS LOOK LIKE IN 100 YEARS?

Technology is shaping the future of dental implants, and the possibilities for innovations are endless. In the United States alone, over 100 million people are missing at least one tooth. Dental implants are predicted to be worth over $4.4 billion dollars globally by 2020. Due to this growing number, it’s important to stay up to date on the latest techniques and devices used in oral implantation.

DENTAL IMPLANTS AFTER ORAL CANCER TREATMENT

Head-and-neck cancer is the most common cancer worldwide with an estimated global incidence of 500,000 new cases annually. The term "oral cancer" is used to define any cancer that develops in tissues of the mouth, face, salivary glands, throat and neck. Patients with oral cancer are generally treated with a combination of radiotherapy and ablative surgery.

By Jay Bietilla | April 22, 2019|

Dental Implants

DENTAL IMPLANTS: The Latest News and Research

Technology is helping dental and oral health clinicians provide faster, more accurate, and well-rounded treatment to their patients. The dental world is undergoing major changes thanks to advancements in new technology.

IMPLANT BAR OVERDENTURE VS. ALL-ON-FOUR

If your patient suffers from tooth loss, they probably desire a restorative solution that will help them eat their favorite foods again and smile with confidence. In the past, the only option for replacing teeth was dentures. Patients would have to cement their dentures into their mouths using a temporary glue and then remove them at night, repeating the same tedious process over and over again. Not only was the installation and removal process tasking, but dentures often came loose, causing bits of food to get under them.

HOW TECHNOLOGY IS CHANGING THE WAY WE PLACE DENTAL IMPLANTS

Technology is helping dental and oral health clinicians provide faster, more accurate, and well-rounded treatment to their patients. The dental world is undergoing major changes thanks to advancements in new technology. When dental implants were invented by a Swedish medical researcher in 1952, the procedure was considered a modern-day miracle. Now, seven decades later we’re experiencing another massive breakthrough in the form of digitally guided implants. With the right tools, dentists can virtually diagnose and treat cases before ever touching the patient. This lessens the margin for unexpected errors and outcomes during surgery. Dentists can design and print surgical guides from their office or outsource it to a dental laboratory.

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